ALiEM MEDiC X-over Wrap: The Case of the Difficult Debrief


In early November the Simulcast Team combined forces with the team behind the ALiEM MEdIC Series for a joint case discussion around “The Case of the Difficult Debrief”.  After a fantastic online discussion involving a number of simulation superstars, a summary of the case and the discussions were uploaded at the ALiEM Website here. 

ALiEM

For those who aren’t aware, the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine “Medical Education in Cases” series puts difficult medical education cases under a microscope through facilitating an online discussion about hypothetical educational dilemmas.  Their cases and expert responses were the original inspiration for the Simulcast Journal Club and their website is a tour de force of FOAMed role modelling that is well worth spending a lot of time in. 

In our inaugural crossover podcast, Ben Symon talks to Dr Brent Thoma (@Brent_Thoma) who is Emergency Medicine Research Director at the University of Saskatchewan and an Associate Editor of ALiEM, and expert commenter Dr Andrew Hall (@AKHallMD) who is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Queen’s University). 

Join us as we discuss what differences exist between the skills involved in clinical teaching and simulation debriefing, how to gain the trust of your learners, using “The Cheng Approach” to find a more learner centered structure to your debriefs, and wait in peril to see just what mysterious Canadian rodents are stalking Dr Hall in the air vents above his laptop. 


About Ben Symon

Ben is a Paediatric Emergency Physician. He is based at The Prince Charles Hospital in Brisbane. In 2014 Ben was the first Simulation Fellow for Children's Health Queensland, and assisted in the statewide roll out of the SToRK Team's RMDDP program. He currently teaches on a variety of paediatric simulation based courses at Lady Cilento Children's Hospital on paediatric resuscitation, trauma and CRM principles. As a relatively new simulation educator, Ben has a growing interest in encouraging clinical educators to be more familiar with simulation research.

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