75 – Advances in Simulation: Another Debriefing Course! Who Benefits?


Another debriefing course! Who benefits? 

Kristian Krogh, Albert Chan, and Nancy McNaughton 

 

Many health professional educators attend courses on simulation debriefing, but do they actually perform better as simulation debriefers as a result?  

Writing in Advances in SimulationKristian Krogh (@DrKrogh), Albert Chan (@gaseousXchange) and Nancy McNaughton (@uto_nancy) provoke us to consider this issue in their commentary – Another debriefing course! Who benefits? 

In this next instalment in our collaboration with Advances in Simulation, I spoke with Kristian and Nancy about the article. They suggest that high quality debriefing courses are not enough, and that we need to think more transfer to our local contexts, with a community of practice for peer feedback and support.

 


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2 thoughts on “75 – Advances in Simulation: Another Debriefing Course! Who Benefits?

  • Mariana

    Hi! Listening from Chile.
    I teach some basic nursing subjects or undergraduate at UDLA (Universidad De Las Americas).
    I can relate to what you say, I think that you can pick up some tips that can only apply to some specific scenarios and/or student groups.
    I`ve also observed that when running debriefing on this courses, it`s hard to focus on how running debriefing because our students focus on content, so we do the same on these courses.
    It is so important to stablish this community, from my colleagues I think I have taken some really important advices.

    Glad to be listening you!
    Mariana M.

    • Jesse Spurr

      Thanks for listening and commenting, Mariana. I you nail the point – debriefing is dependent on context. It is great to hear how others build up their toolbox of debriefing and conversation/interpersonal skills. The trick, just like clinical work, is applying the right tool or technique for the right situation. It is like the old saying, if a you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail. Do you and your colleagues have a formal process of peer-review and feedback on teaching sessions?